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Family Law... Travelling with Children? What You Should Bring with You

While the documents required may differ depending on the method of transport you will be using (motor vehicle versus airplane) or the location you will be going (interprovincially versus internationally), this blog post focuses on the documents that are recommended you have in your possession at all times when traveling with your child without the other parent.

Danika Beaulieu – August 2018

Whether you intend to travel with your child to another province or country, if the other parent will not be traveling with you, there are certain documents  you should have in your possession to ensure your travel goes as smoothly as possible.

While the documents required may differ depending on the method of transport you will be using (motor vehicle versus airplane) or the location you will be going (interprovincially versus internationally), this blog post will focus on the documents that are recommended you have in your possession at all times when traveling with your child without the other parent. These documents are as follows:

  1. Proper government I.D. for yourself and your child (such as driver’s licence, birth certificate, citizenship card, etc.);
  2. Passports for yourself and your child (especially if travelling internationally);
  3. Consent letter from the other parent confirming that you have permission to travel with your child to another province or country; and
  4. Any applicable legal documents, such as your Separation Agreement, Court Order, or Death Certificate (if the other parent is deceased).

Having a consent letter from the other parent is important because airport security, border services, and police are always on the look out for missing children or possible child abductions. Although these entities do not always ask for a consent letter from the other parent, if they do request one and you do not have it, you may find yourself in a difficult situation. It is also strongly recommended that you have the travel consent letter witnessed and authenticated by a notary public or a lawyer, so that border officials will be less likely to questions its authenticity.

If you or the other parent intends to travel with your child in the near future, and you would like to prepare a travel consent letter, you can either visit the Government of Canada website, which has an interactive form that you can modify to fit your needs, or you can contact one of the lawyers here at MDW Law to draft and notarize a letter that fits your specific situation.

Whether you would like a travel consent letter drafted, notarized, or you find yourself in a situation where the other parent is refusing to sign a consent letter in advance of your travel, please contact MDW Law and one of our lawyers will be happy to assist you.

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